CLASS SUPPLY LISTS

Supply lists for my pastel and oil workshops are listed below. Click on images or other links to purchase from Amazon.

Pastel Workshop Supply List

PASTELS

You will need a large range of colors and several values in each of those colors of pastel sticks. Please unwrap each stick before you arrive. 1/2 pastel sticks are fine to use, so if you want to split boxes of pastels with a friend you can get twice as many colors for your money. (I am happy to connect members of the class interested in splitting sets of pastels, let me know if you are interested).

 

Nupastel box of 96 is a great box, it has a good range of colors and values please get at least this box or equivalent.

In addition to the box of Nupastels, there are many brands of softer pastels that come in beautiful “usable” colors (more natural less crayola). The benefit of painting with pastels is the depth of color, and having some softer pastels in addition to harder pastels (like Nupastels) allow you to add many layers. My favorite of these softer brands is Great American. I recommend getting a collection box (southwestern landscape, or plein air, etc) This will give you a good range of color and values.

There are many other good brands of softer pastels: Terry Ludwig, Sennelier (half stick Paris collection), and Unison to name a few.

PAPER

Please bring at least 4 sheets per day of sanded paper. I use UArt 400-600 grit, and Ampersand Pastel board for my bigger paintings. I use wet dry sandpaper (from the hardware store) 500 grit for my smaller paintings. These wet dry sheets are 9x11″, I use them for 8x10″ and 5x7″ paintings (I will have these for sale for 50 cents a sheet if you would like to purchase some from me, just let me know).

SUPPORT

A smooth surface like GATOR-BOARD or Masonite work well. Make sure your support is large enough to allow for a few inches of border all around your pastel surface. GatorBoard is available in white or black. In brightly lit situations, black is preferable. Masonite boards are also OK. Sheets of tracing paper or glassine may be used to protect the pastel painting surfaces for transport.

OTHER SUPPLIES

N

A journal, sharpie, pen, and pencil

N

a bristle brush for under paintings

N

a small empty jar for denature alcohol

N

Denatured alcohol (from hardware store)

N

A smock or apron

N

Artist’s masking tape

N

pencil, pen, marker, small notebook for studies

N

baby wipes

N

water bottle, hat, insect repellent, and sunscreen

N

Disposable gloves (optional)

Photos

I have a big box of reference photos you are welcome to work from. If you have some 4″x6″ photos you would like to contribute to the box I would be delighted! You are welcome and encouraged to work from your own photos, printed or on a tablet.

App

Plein air magazine has an app available for iPhone or iPad that I use frequently. It cost $5 and is helpful but by no means required.

Oil Workshop Supply List

PAINT

I enjoy having a few tubes of colors that are premixed, the extra colors I choose have to do with my location and mood. I find color is very personal, and suggest choosing extra colors intuitively. I tend to see a lot of orange and yellow in the world around me. My extra colors are currently: Naples yellow, transparent orange, Violet, and warm grey.

 

N

Big tube of titanium white (or several smaller tubes)

N

Alizarin crimson

N

Cadmium red light

N

Cadmium yellow light

N

Olive Green (optional)

N

Viridian (optional)

N

Greenish Umber (optional)

N

Cerulean Blue (Hue Ok)

N

Ultramarine blue

CLEANING

One tube gamblin solvent free medium

Gamsol or other odor free medium to wash brushes and thin paint.

I use a Lindseeed oil soap to clean my brushes

 

BRUSHES AND PALETTE

Brushes, Minimum Flat or filbert bristle: sizes: 2, 6, 8 (optional 10)

Palette: This can be wooden or disposable palette paper. I use a New Wave wooden palette, or a grey disposable palette pad.

at least one palette knife

 

SUPPORTS / WET PANEL CARRIER

Please bring at least 12 panels and wet panel carriers to match the size of your supports. You can work 5x7, 6x6, 6x8, 8x8, 8x10, 9x12, or 11x14. My favorite panels are Ray Mar feather weight panels, but they are pricey so I often supplement with cheaper panels. If you are new to oils, I recommend working smaller, no bigger than 8x10. I like to bring a variety of sized panels to match my energy level and time constraints that I have with each painting session.

Unless you KNOW your painting style is VERY THIN, assume that your paintings will all be wet heading home. Make a plan to get them home safely. I do this by bringing wet panel carriers to fit my paintings. The most I have painted in a week long painting trip was 18 paintings. I painted: four 8x8″, six 8x10″, two 9x12″, two 11x14″, four 5x7″ Before I leave for a painting trip, I load all my dry panels into my wet panel carriers, so I can make sure I can get them all home safely. Buy your panel carriers and panels sized to match.

OTHER SUPPLIES

N

Apron

N

Paper towels or tissues (at least two rolls or boxes)

N

Pen, pencil, and sketchpad or notecards

N

Disposable gloves (optional)

N

Viewfinder (optional)

N

Hat or visor

Photos

I have a big box of reference photos you are welcome to work from. If you have some 4″x6″ photos you would like to contribute to the box I would be delighted! You are welcome and encouraged to work from your own photos, printed or on a tablet.

App

Plein air magazine has an app available for iPhone or iPad that I use frequently. It cost $5 and is helpful but by no means required.

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